Goodwill: Being Strategic About Your Giving Decisions

December 26th, 2019

Supporting the local community can be expensive. Even large organizations have to be careful about how and where they lend their time – and money. Is there value – beyond personal satisfaction – in supporting local events and activities? Which ones? How can you say “no” graciously to the many requests that come your way? Read the rest of this entry »

10 Tips for Writing Great Copy!

December 24th, 2019

Whether you’re writing a brochure, copy for a newspaper ad, a script for a radio announcement or a page or blog for your web site, there are some tried and true techniques that can help you make sure that your copy gets the results you’re looking for.

Think about writing copy as making a sales pitch to a customer. Your goal is to persuade that customer to do something – most likely to purchase your product or service. Here’s how: Read the rest of this entry »

Let It Snow! Big Brands Risk Failure When They Rely on Third Party Partners

December 19th, 2019

by Justin Grensing, Esq., MBA

Just in time for Christmas, Walmart Canada provides a great example of how aggressive sales expansion can tarnish a company’s brand.

There is a natural conflict that exists between sales growth and brand protection. As sales expand—whether geographically or in terms of volume of goods or number of customers, etc.—it is harder and harder for companies to maintain tight control over the products and services carrying its name and impacting its brand. Read the rest of this entry »

Peloton: The Latest Example of Consumer Outrage Over Ad Content

December 17th, 2019

Occasionally companies and their advertising teams will find themselves in hot water for controversial advertisements or campaigns that set out to be edgy or funny, but push the envelope a bit too far. Consider, among the many examples, Bacardi’s “ugly girlfriend” ad, Burger King’s sexually suggestive “Super Seven Incher” ads and Dove’s “Before & After” ad showing a transition from a black to a white woman.

Likely these companies knew they were taking a risk in putting those ads out there but didn’t fully appreciate the likelihood of the level of potential backlash. But sometimes ads not intended to contain any type of offensive content still manage to offend. Read the rest of this entry »

Payment Milestones: A Positive Cash-Flow Approach for Long-Term B2B Projects

December 13th, 2019

by Justin Grensing, Esq., MBA

In many B2B relationships, the amounts of money changing hands can be significant. For small businesses engaged primarily in the B2B realm, a single B2B client could make up a huge percentage of the small business’s total revenue. Moreover, the products and services offered to B2B customers can be fairly complex and take time to deliver in full. All of this makes the invoicing process a valuable tool for small-business owners serving B2B customers. A well-designed invoicing system can help smooth cash flows and provide revenue even before the ultimate completion of a final deliverable. Read the rest of this entry »

Making an Offer They Can’t Refuse—or Use

December 2nd, 2019

by Justin Grensing, Esq., MBA

The tension between the marketing function and the operations function has a well-established history. Marketing wants to sell, but operations has to deliver. Sure it’s great to come up with an idea to sell custom-built widgets at a low price with quick delivery. But, ultimately,  someone (operations) actually has to deliver. Read the rest of this entry »

Important Marketing and Branding Takeaways From Krispy Kreme and a Youthful Entrepreneur

November 27th, 2019

by Justin Grensing, Esq., MBA

Every once in a while, a real-life situation comes up that lends itself nicely to some core marketing concepts. These serve as great teaching tools and discussion points because they actually happened, and they’re relatable. Here’s a recent example involving Krispy Kreme and an entrepreneurial college student. Read the rest of this entry »

Good News: Working Less Leads to Greater Productivity!

November 14th, 2019

Women considering yes, no, maybe optionsby Justin Grensing, Esq., MBA

 

The results of a recent experiment by Microsoft Japan lend additional weight to previous real-world data showing significant gains in productivity by—wait for it—working less!.

The company found that shifting to a four-day workweek resulted in productivity gains of 40 percent. While this correlation might sound counterintuitive at first glance, it’s easy to understand the direction of the impact when taking a closer look at productivity; although the size of the impact is still impressive. For context, the biggest jump in national year-over-year productivity in the United States going back to 1949 was about 10 percent with other cyclical peaks usually ranging somewhere between three and 5 percent. There have been some dips of negative productivity growth, but those are relatively rare. Read the rest of this entry »

Be Thankful You Only Have a Couple of Clocks to Set Back…  

November 11th, 2019

by Justin Grensing, Esq., MBA

 

Even with an ever-increasing number of our “clocks” smart enough to change themselves on daylight saving time, most of us have to take a few minutes to remember how to change the time on our ovens, microwaves and cars. Or maybe we just let them be an hour off until the clocks switch back in a few months. Either way, it’s a minor annoyance. For most of us… Read the rest of this entry »

Are You a Slave to SEO Keywords? Why You Should Write for People, Not Bots

November 3rd, 2019

Search engine optimization (SEO) is a very important consideration in today’s digitally-driven content environment. After all, if you can’t get visitors to your site, and get them to engage with your content, you’ve obviously missed the mark. But, in an increasingly competitive quest to rank ever higher in Google SERP (search engine results page), some content marketers may go a bit overboard when it comes to chasing the numbers.

Read the rest of this entry »