How to Reach Out to Potential LinkedIn Connections

August 20th, 2019

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Having the right connections—whether investors, customers, partners, suppliers or employees, etc.—can be a huge difference maker in company success. LinkedIn, the Facebook of professional networking, was purposely built and marketed as a great way to develop and maintain these connections. And it work if used effectively.  Read the rest of this entry »

How to Deal With Communication Dabblers

August 15th, 2019

If you’re ever created content for any purpose, chances are you’ve encountered a dabbler. A dabbler is someone who, when asked to review copy (or who is responsible for reviewing copy because of their position), suffers from severe scope creep. They just can’t stop themselves from offering far more, and far more detailed, input than what was expected.

Dabblers like to dabble. It’s what they do. Unfortunately, what they do can create a lot of headaches, and much rework and added expense, for those in the business of producing and publishing content of any kind.  Read the rest of this entry »

Keeping Your Awareness and Engagement Efforts Focused

August 13th, 2019

market research, marketing researchWe’ve written before about the sales funnel—the process through which potential customers become aware of, engage with and, hopefully, ultimately become actual customers of your company. The first part of this funnel is typically referred to as “awareness.” This is the stage at which the market—as you’ve defined it—becomes aware of your product or service. They may never be interested in making a purchase or even learning more about you, but they are aware you exist and have entered this first section of your funnel.

At the heart of the sales process is the drive to move potential customers through the funnel from awareness to action—i.e., making a purchase. A lot of resources are put into measuring the losses at each stage of the funnel and figuring out the sources of that attrition and how to reduce it. Unfortunately, a lot of these resources may be wasted. Read the rest of this entry »

How Businesses Often Fumble with Customer Feedback

August 8th, 2019

Hiring marketing or content marketing talent?Businesses spend a lot of time and money trying to gain insights into how customers perceive their product or service offerings. This might involve conducting surveys and focus groups to hear directly from customers. Or, it might involve efforts to ascertain customer preferences based on online behavior and purchase decisions. And yet, despite the general accessibility of this type of information, so many businesses still misread customers. That lack of awareness limits their ability to improve the customer experience.  Read the rest of this entry »

Benefits of Better Tracking for Marketing Spend

August 6th, 2019

content marketing, content management, content strategy, strategic marketing, marketing strategically, strategic communicationsOne of the persistent challenges for marketing departments is the ability to determine a reliable and justifiable return on investment for their marketing spend. One common reason given for this challenge is the difficulty in attributing revenue to specific marketing activities. But in an article for Forbes, Stephen Diorio argues that there is a need for improvement in how the money that is spent is categorized and tracked. Read the rest of this entry »

That’s Irrational! The Weird Ways Consumers Behave and Why

August 1st, 2019

Economic theory has some fundamental assumptions underpinning it. One of the most important is that people behave rationally. In other words, that the decisions we make are designed to fulfill our best interests.

But we know this is not always the case. Read the rest of this entry »

No-Cost, Low-Cost Ways to Boost Your Brand

July 30th, 2019

We’ve previously discussed the challenges many companies face when trying to calculate an ROI on their marketing efforts. For small and medium-sized businesses, this can make it difficult to justify increasing spend on marketing efforts.

But, just because you feel like you can’t spend more money on marketing doesn’t mean you can’t invest in your brand. Read the rest of this entry »

Papa John’s Takes a Dip; Shaq Comes to the Rescue in More Ways Than One

July 25th, 2019

Having a real person associated with your brand can help your company connect with consumers on a personal level. It can also bring negative publicity from the actions or statements of those spokespeople. While it might be harder for audiences to connect personally with the Trix Bunny or Pillsbury Dough Boy, neither is likely to be in the news for making offensive statements or getting arrested.

That can’t be said for real-life figureheads or spokespeople.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Promise and Perils of Performance Marketing

July 23rd, 2019

market research, marketing researchOne of the challenges for — and criticisms of — the marketing function is that it’s often difficult to calculate an ROI on a company’s marketing efforts. For example, how does a soft drink or beer company determine whether or not their multi-million-dollar Super Bowl ad was worth the investment? How can they tell whether a customer made a purchase based on that ad as opposed to a purchase they were going to make anyway? Not an easy task.

And yet both employers and clients want (and deserve) to know if their marketing investments are paying off for them. Fortunately the measurement game these days is often much more straightforward than in the past.  Read the rest of this entry »

Goby the Trash Fish and Nudge Marketing

July 11th, 2019

Behavioral economics is the study of how and why consumers do not always act rationally —rational behavior is one of the fundamental assumptions underlying classical economics. Behavioral economics helps explain things like why consumers make impulse purchases and incorrectly value goods and services. Two of my favorite behavioral economists are Dan Ariely and Steven D. Levitt, authors of Predictably Irrational and Freakonomics, respectively–two books I highly recommend.

Nudge marketing is a key form of behavioral economics. It involves providing subtle “nudges” to guide human behavior in ways that serve marketers’ needs. Here we take a look at some interesting examples of how elements of behavioral economics can be put to work in the field of marketing.

Read the rest of this entry »